Tag Archives: environment

Hanging your clothes

23 Jun

If you’ve been with us throughout the laundry series, you understand the environmental mess they call dry cleaning and it’s environmentally friendly alternative, wet cleaning; the self-regulated fragrance industry that adds chemical scents to your laundry products that cause allergic reactions, gendered laundry products (yes, for real), and ecological and economical wash and dry alternatives to cleaning your clothes.

Now that your clothes are clean and fresh, I’d like to offer some tips on clothing storage that will keep your clothes looking good and protect your clothing investments, no matter how much you’ve paid for them.

You might think that a hanger is a hanger, but there are many types of hangers for different types of clothes. Hangers are used for clothing storage but also for clothing support. Like anything else, clothing is subject to gravity; clothing can be heavy, so storing your clothes on hangers substantial enough to support the weight of your garments is key. wooden hanger

1. Shirts: Hang your good shirts on nice hangers – a wider wooden hanger will support the weight of your shirt. Fasten the top button to preserve the shape of the collar. (A covered wire hanger will also do, depending on the weight of your shirt – i.e. t-shirts and other knits. Uncovered wire hangers may leave rust marks on the shoulders of your shirts, so if you’re hanging your shirts to dry – and I hope you are – use a covered wire hanger.)

Wider hangers will take up more room in your closet but allow for air movement so your shirts won’t be crushed = fresher clothing, less ironing (18 wooden hangers for $19.99 at good old Canadian Tire).

suit hanger with pant clips

This wooden suit hanger supports the shoulder and features a pant clip that will keep trousers smooth.

2. This is a suit hanger. The width of the hanger supports and preserves the roundness of the jacket’s hard shoulder and takes the weight of the garment. Lighter summer suits (cotton or seersucker) can take a thinner hanger, but heavier woolen winter suits or linen suits with a bottom weight ask for a substantial hanger like the one at left – note the trouser clip – see #3 below.

A solid wood hanger  could also be used for heavy outdoor coats – this will help to keep the coat in shape.

3.  Trousers should hang straight down, not stored over a hanger – pant hanger this creates a horizontal wrinkle in the trouser leg because the garment is draped over a bar that cannot support the weight of the pant.

To avoid trouser creases, use a pant hanger: turn trousers upside down, hems together, and fold in half at the center leg crease, or match up trouser seams if there is no crease. Clip or sandwich on the hanger, depending on its style.

You went to the trouble of buying your clothing,  so protect and maintain your wardrobe. Take pride in your closet as much as you take pride in your clothes, gents, and do them right with the proper hanger.

PS: It’s summer and In the Key of He will do re-runs of posts past. Enjoy the season!

Exfoliating without microbeads

14 May
Plastic microbeads in your facial wash go straight down the drain and into the water system.

Plastic microbeads in your facial wash go straight down the drain and into the water system.

I often talk to my clients about using exfoliants to remove the dull dead skin cells that sit on the surface of the skin to keep it soft, supple, and youthful. Exfoliated skin feels better, looks polished, and takes age off a guy’s face. It’s also a great pre-shave step which softens men’s whiskers and lets the razor glide right over. Once guys are on the bandwagon, there’s no turning back.

However, there are massive environmental concerns with some commercial exfoliant products that contain microbeads – tiny plastic beads that are so small that they slip through the water treatment process and end up, at least in Ontario, in the Great Lakes. Tiny bits of plastic in water systems can wreak havoc on our marine environment and ultimately, us. Environmental Defence says that microbeads “are being eaten by fish and birds, which can cause digestive blockages, dehydration, and even death from starvation thanks to stomachs full of plastic. The plastics absorb dangerous toxics that can harm wildlife when they mistake the colourful beads for food”. Since we get much of our drinking water from the Great Lakes, I’ve read that these beads can end up in our drinking water and beverages made with water (i.e. beer!).

It’s an issue that is gaining ground. In March of this year, Ontario MPP, Marie-France Lalonde, introduced a private member’s bill to ban the manufacture and use of microbeads. South of the border, Illinois has passed a state-wide ban on microbeads, and New Jersey, Colorado, and Wisconsin are in the process of banning them too. Back in 2012, The Guardian discussed the global effects of microbeads in the oceans and said that “the [beauty] industry needs a reminder that an ecosystem driven to the edge will not be productive”. Happily, CBC reports that “L’Oreal, the Body Shop and Johnson & Johnson all committed to phasing out plastic microbeads by 2015, and Proctor & Gamble said it would do so by 2017.” This is wonderful news on many levels.

Natural alternatives

We don’t need plastic beads to keep our skin smooth – there are lots of natural alternatives. For instance, I recommend a pre-shave facial cleanser from Bread & Butter men’s skincare line which uses biodegradable rice flour granules as the exfoliating agent.

A friend who sees a naturopath uses plain old baking soda mixed with water to make a paste and uses that on his face to exfoliate his skin. He uses this very inexpensive and environmentally friendly exfoliant once a week; his skin looks clean and polished and he says it feels great.

Some people will turn to drug store exfoliant products that contain things like broken nut shells or fruit pits. Natural, yes, but these are somewhat harsh on the skin because the pieces of shell or pit are not rounded, and pointy bits of hard shell rolled over the face can damage the skin. Better alternatives are found at neighbourhood health stores that carry different exfoliant products, or check the multitude of online suggestions for natural facial scrubs.

For guys who want to take it a step further and give their whole bodies a good exfoliation, Janet Perry, a Certified Holistic Nutritionist™ in Calgary, offers her own recipe for an inexpensive DIY sea salt body scrub for the shower (not to be used on the face):

1/2 cup good quality oil such as almond, jojoba, avacado, olive, or grapeseed

1 cup sea salt (if your skin is sensitive, substitute sugar for salt)

5 – 15 drops of good quality (i.e. organic, therapeutic grade) essential oils like lemon, lavender, peppermint, or rosemary oil

1.  Put the sea salt (or sugar) in a glass bowl.
2.  Pour in the oil and mix with a wooden spoon.  The texture should be moist enough to hold together; if the mixture is too oily, add more sea salt.
3.  Add 5 – 15 drops of your favourite essential oil, and combine well.
4.  Transfer to a sterilized glass jar and store in a cool, dry place.

Also check out exfoliating gloves and towels from places like the Body Shop that you can soap up and use like you would a wash cloth. Feels great but be gentle exfoliating around your privates, gents.

It’s not much of a sacrifice to make a change from plastic microbeads in commercial facial exfoliants (and toothpaste and body wash products); you’ll be more natural, find more money in your pocket, and you won’t add to the water pollution problem that currently faces us.

Click here to send a letter of support for Ms. Lalonde’s bill to Glen Murray, Minister of Environment and Climate Change, and make the push for banning microbeads stronger with your voice.

Declare war on salt!

5 Mar

I’ve had too many pairs of winter boots destroyed by road salt and I’m mad as hell!

salt winter boots

My disgusting, now defunct suede winter boots eaten by salt. Even the zippers are salt-dried. What a waste.

In Ontario, where I currently live, road salt is used so heavily that the streets are white with it and there is fine white salt powder on everything. Salt is a highly corrosive mineral that leaves a mark on not only our footwear, but damages nature, metals, and building materials.

Catherine Houska, metallurgical engineer, says that despite environmental concerns, salt for de-icing changes the chemistry of soil, is harmful to plants, trees, and fish, and it’s use continues to grow–even “sunbelt” cities now stock salt for freezing rain.

After reading Houska’s Deicing Salt: Recognizing the Corrosion Threat, I realize just how damaging and far-reaching salt pollution is. “Deicing salt poses a significant but often unrecognized corrosion threat to architectural metals and other construction materials,” Houska writes. “Seasonal deicing salt accumulations have been documented up to 1.9 km from busy roadways and as high as the 59th floor of a high-rise building.”

Overuse of road salt in Ontario wreaks havoc on land and crops that we need to eat. In a recent legal case in Ontario, farmers sued the local government for losses on their crops due to the use of road salt and won. With any luck, this case will set a precedent and the use of corrosive de-icing salts and the destructive effects on land and vegetation will be examined and changes made, possibly moving us to a non-corrosive grit for winter traction like sand, used in places like Saskatchewan and in Russia.

Salt’s corrosive nature can eat its way through even the thickest treated leathers. This winter, I watched my once-waterproof suede boots destroyed by road salt to the degree that water seeped into the outside of the boot and left my feet wet, plus, they look so awful that I am embarrassed to wear them, despite spraying with protective footwear products and regular cleanings with water and vinegar to neutralize salt’s corrosive effects. The salt literally ate through the suede and dried out the zipper so much that they are useless now. So what do I do with them? Thousands of boots and shoes have been rendered useless after being eaten by salt, and most of these will find themselves in landfills, adding to our polluted world. There must be an alternative.

The switch to synthetics

Though I’m not a fan of synthetics, once my suede boots went down, I decided that I will not throw any more money away on leather or suede (to be honest, I’ve decided not to wear leather anything anymore because of the animal cruelty and environmental pollution involved in the leather-tanning process). I’ve ordered waterproof synthetic boots that salt should brush off of. I reckon that this will prevent a volume of winter boots from going into the landfill because the salt will not corrode this particular material, and the boots will have a longer life, create less waste, and reduce the demand for more boots.

I’ve written before about the downfall of rubber boots in the Huffington Post that are now so cheaply made that they crack after one season’s wear and quickly fill the dump with spent boots. I am a huge supporter of investing in good footwear that is environmentally responsible and that one can maintain with visits to shoe repair shops to stretch the boot’s life. A Canadian company that makes good waterproof boots is Kamik. Kamik boots are recyclable and made of vulcanized rubber (the process in which rubber is heated to a high temperature which binds unstable rubber polymer chains and makes them strong, elastic, and waterproof, as opposed to cheap PVC which easily cracks and is quickly tossed). Even better, some Kamik boot styles are available at your local Canadian Tire store!

What I really like about Kamik boots is that they are serious about sustainabilty. They make boot liners and linings from recycled water bottles; soles are 100% recyclable, and they create “innovative materials like Ecologic Rubber.” Not only does Kamik use recycled products in their footwear, they also offer a recycling program on some styles: Our shoes last a really long time, but when you’ve worn them into the ground, keep them from getting buried in it by sending them back to us. Brilliant.

Style

Now, many of Kamik’s boots for men are for the outdoors and outdoor activites like farming and winter sport, but what about urban men who wear suits to work? The answer is the coloruful, modern-day Norwegian-designed golash, SWIMS. SWIMS can come in the form of an overshoe or overboot, a stylish alternative to salt-eaten shoes and heavy winter boots. SWIMS has collaborated with the likes of Armani and bootmaker, John Lobb, to bring protective footwear into the stylish spotlight. These products use a type of insulated, tear-resistant rubber to protect your shoes from the ravages of winter moisture. However, I cannot see anything linking sustainability to this company, and that’s unfortunate.

Since most of us do not make governmental decisions about road safety and cannot reduce the use of salt used on roads (though we can contact our local politicians to make our voices heard), our alternative is to choose winter footwear that will last longer than permeable materials like leather, and take them to the shoe maker for repair when needed. Our saving grace would be to wear footwear that we could throw in the blue bin when we’re finished with them, eliminating waste and continuously re-using the boot materials.

There are beginnings of this but nothing is full-blown yet: there are shoe recycling spots (mostly in the U.S. where 300 million pairs of shoes go to landfills each year), Nike has a U.S.-based running shoe recycling program, and we’re stating to see small companies develop recyclable shoes. Excellent steps forward, but for us Canadians, we need responsible, recyclable, waterproof boots.

Anyone?